It is preferable that students contact the lecturer via email as he/she is often out of the office. Responses to emails will be sent within 48hrs. Please indicate on the priority listing of the email if an urgent response is required. Please also be aware that only emails using your UTS Student email account will be read and answered. Teaching staff Assessor Professor Andrew Hayen Email: andrew.hayen@uts.edu.au Subject description Social science concepts and perspectives are essential for understanding health issues and the responses to them as individuals and as a society. This subject examines different theoretical perspectives to explore the human experience of illness and the social structuring of health and disease. The impact of wider social processes upon the health of individuals and social groups is also examined, including processes that produce social inequalities, professional relationships, knowledge and power, and consumption and risk. Students investigate contemporary issues to explore how the social determinants of health can inform the complex challenges of technological, economic and social change in communities and societies. Subject learning objectives (SLOs) Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to: A. Define key concepts in health inequalities B. Critically appraise research findings relevant to social determinants and health inequalities C. Evaluate explanations for socially determined health inequalities in relation to selected public health issues D. Examine the impact of social norms and behaviour on access to health services, care and information and health policy and practice examples in health care in a range of Australian Indigenous, national and global settings E. Apply theoretical perspectives on health inequalities to policy options for public health Course area UTS: Health Delivery Autumn 2018; block mode; City Credit points 6cp Result type Grade and marks 19/02/2018 (Autumn 2018) © University of Technology Sydney Page 1 of 9 Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs) This subject also contributes specifically to the following graduate attributes: Demonstrate reflective critical thinking to enable critical appraisal of current practice, policy and research with the aim to enhance health care and health care outcomes, and transform health (1.0) Are socially, culturally and ethically accountable when engaging with individuals, families, interdisciplinary teams, communities, organisations and jurisdictions) (3.0) Embody the international standard of professional qualities appropriate to the scope of their role in regional, national and global health (5.0) Contribution to the development of graduate attributes 1. Demonstrate reflective critical thinking to enable critical appraisal of current practice, policy and research with the aim to enhance health care and health care outcomes, and transform health 3. Are socially, culturally and ethically accountable when engaging with individuals, families, interdisciplinary teams, communities, organisations and jurisdictions) 5. Embody the international standard of professional qualities appropriate to the scope of their role in regional, national and global health Teaching and learning strategies In this subject students will participate in a range of teaching and learning strategies that are designed to develop knowledge and critical thinking in social perspectives of Public Health. On-campus class room activities will include lectures, small group collaboration, briefings and round table activities, field activities, simulated role plays and small group discussions and problem solving. On-line activities are supported by online preparatory work and follow-up activities including podcasts, multimedia resources and selected readings. Feedback will be provided during on line and in class discussions. Content (topics) Topic 1: Social Determinants of Public Health Social and cultural factors that impact and mediate health and well-being, illness, disease and health-seeking/health care utilization The biomedical model and social approaches to health issues in the community Theoretical perspectives on health inequalities Topic 2: Examination of social perspectives to contemporary public health research Non communicable disease Sexual and reproductive health Maternal health Alcohol and other drugs Global health issues Indigenous health Topic 3: The role of policy in addressing the social determinants of health Policy levels for tackling health inequalities Healthy public policy in action Presenting decision makers with policy options 19/02/2018 (Autumn 2018) © University of Technology Sydney Page 2 of 9 Program Week/Session Dates Description online preparation 1-14 March Subject preparation: Academic skills preparation: EBP writing essays video www.lib.uts.edu.au/guides/ nursing-midwifery-health/ evidence-based-practice Avoiding Plagiarism tutorial and quiz avoidingplagiarism.uts.edu.au/#grid3d View: 10 facts on health inequities and their causes www.who.int/features/ factfiles/ health_inequities/ facts/ en/ and www.who.int/sdhconference/ background/ news/ facts/ en/www.mja.com.au/journal/ 2014/ 201/ 8/ persistent-challenge-inequality-australias-health Watch: A short film about the Social Determinants of health in the municipality of Chatham-Kent in Southwestern Ontario, Canada www.youtube.com/watch?v=NyTni-vn93Y Watch: The Epidemic of Child Marriage in Bangladesh www.youtube.com/watch?v=0pJk6M5LgCg . Notes: Write: Optional activity: How does the society into which people are born and live shape their beliefs, behaviour, and life chances (including health outcomes)? Post your response on-line and if possible make a response to a point make by a fellow student. Workshop 1 14 March Pre workshop activities: How are Health Inequalities and Health Inequity defined? See site for definitions: View: The European Portal for Action on Health Inequities provides an overview of key terms and concepts linked to action on health inequalities and the social determinants of health http://www.health-inequalities.eu/HEALTHEQUITY/EN/about_hi/glossary/ Read: Braveman, P. 2006, ‘Health disparities and health equity: concepts and measurement’, Annu. Rev. Public Health, vol. 27, pp. 167-94. Watch: TEDxHouston 2011 – Angela Blanchard https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XU_vVt298gw Formative feedback on the pre-workshop activities will be given on line Workshop activities: Introduction to the subject. 19/02/2018 (Autumn 2018) © University of Technology Sydney Page 3 of 9 Workshop activities: Introduction to the subject. Engage: Lecture and group activities on the social determinants of health and health inequality. Group walk: Mapping the social determinants of health through a collaborative group transect walk in Glebe. Discuss: Debriefing activity and feedback. Notes: Please wear comfortable shoes for this activity Workshop 2 20th March Pre workshop activities: Read: Say, L. & Raine, R. 2007, ‘A systematic review of inequalities in the use of maternal health care in developing countries: examining the scale of the problem and the importance of context’, Bulletin of the World Health Organization, vol. 85, no. 10, pp. 812-9. Potvin, L., et al. (2005). “Integrating Social Theory Into Public Health Practice.” American Journal of Public Health 95(4): 591-595. Krieger, N. 2001, ‘Theories for social epidemiology in the 21st century: an ecosocial perspective’, International Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 668-77. Read and summarise the main points from these documents. Workshop activities: 1. Group activity to examine social determinants in Say & Raine (2007) research paper. 2. Overview of social disparities and Aboriginal health. 3. Introduction to the social construction of health and death. 4. Class discussion of pre reading on theoretic frameworks. 5. Introduction to assets based approaches in public health and social epidemiology. Notes: Students will work in small groups in the workshop to examine and identify social determinants from several research papers. This will inform the student about key concepts and help support learning for assignment 1, a video presentation. On-line activities 2- 6 April Theoretical and conceptual frameworks for understanding health inequities Watch: The Political Economy of Health Inequalities https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-NCTYqAub8g Discuss: What role has the political economy and state in health inequality by posting your response on the bulletin board followed by a moderated discussion. 19/02/2018 (Autumn 2018) © University of Technology Sydney Page 4 of 9 On-line activities 9- 13 April On-line Journal club discussion on social perspectives in contemporary public health research. Students will present their YouTube video and all students will discuss using the discussion board followed by a moderated discussion. On-line activities 16-20 April On-line Journal club discussion on social perspectives in contemporary public health research. Student must select a paper and summarise key findings and post on-line follwed by a moderated discussion. 23 – 27 April STUVAC Online activities April 30- 4 May How have interventions within and beyond the health system to addressed the social determinants of health to improve health Read: Williams, D.R., Costa, M.V., Odunlami, A.O. and Mohammed, S.A., 2008. Moving upstream: how interventions that address the social determinants of health can improve health and reduce disparities. Journal of public health management and practice: JPHMP, 14(Suppl), p.S8. Discuss: Summarise the key approaches and post online. On-line activities 7- 11 May Health in all policies to address social determinants Watch: Challenges and possibilities for implementing health in all policies https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vgpGNtl6P50 Ilona Kickbusch – SA’s Health In All Policies Approach https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p9DuxEpcq8w Explore: Health in all policies resource centre http://www.cdc.gov/policy/hiap/resources/ Draw, photograph and post a concept map of an example of how health in all policy might be achieved Workshop 3 3 May Pre class activities: What is the role of policy in addressing the social determinants of health? Read: Woolf, S.H. and Braveman, P., 2011. Where health disparities begin: the role of social and economic determinants—and why current policies may make matters worse. Health affairs, 30(10), pp.1852-1859. In class activities: Group discussion of Woolf et al. Collaborative activity examining policy options papers Case studies of policy in action: Improving quality health services for vulnerable populations – a policy perspective, Better maternal health outcomes by placing women at the centre of policy, Getting smoking prevention into policy. 19/02/2018 (Autumn 2018) © University of Technology Sydney Page 5 of 9 Online activities 21 – 25 May On-line Question and answer on policy moderated by the lecturer. Online activities 28 May- 1 June On-line Question and answer on policy moderated by the lecturer. Notes: Assignment 2 due June 1 Online activities 4 -8 June Wrap up and reflection, subject evaluation moderated by the lecturer. Assessment Completion of assignments All assessment items must be completed in order to be eligible to pass this subject. Marking Criteria Comprehensive marking criteria for each assignment are available in UTS Online. Attendance There is an expectation that students will attend 100% of scheduled classes. Poor attendance may result in failure of the subject. http://www.gsu.uts.edu.au/rules/student/section-3.html#r3.8 Referencing style The Faculty of Health uses the ‘Harvard (UTS)’ style for in text referencing and production of a reference list. Please refer to www.lib.uts.edu.au/help/referencing/harvard-uts-referencing-guide for guidance on this referencing style. Submitting assignments and keeping copies Assignments must be submitted in MS Word format via the designated Turnitin Assignments portal in UTSOnline for this subject. It is essential that students keep a copy of every piece of work submitted to the Faculty of Health. In the unlikely event that the assignment is misplaced or corrupted, the copy can be provided for marking. Late Assignments Extensions for assignments will only be provided where there are extenuating and unforeseen circumstances. Students seeking an extension must apply to the subject coordinatorby email prior to the day on which the assignment, to which the extension refers, is due. Penalties will be applied for late submission of assessment items without written approval from subject coordinator. Assignments submitted late (with no extension granted) may incur a penalty of 5% per day, to be deducted from the final mark for the assessed work. For example, if an assignment is worth 30 marks and is two days late, the penalty incurred = 3 marks (30 x .05 x 2). If the work was evaluated at 25 out of 30, then the final mark would be = 22 marks (25-3) after the penalty was subtracted from the mark awarded. Unless approval has been given for an extension, assignments will not be accepted or marked if received two weeks after the due date. Special Consideration Students can apply for special consideration during a teaching period, where performance in an assessment task or tasks, including examinations, has been affected by extenuating or special circumstances beyond their control. Special consideration is only required for extensions of more than one week. Students requesting an extension of one week or less should contact their subject coordinator. The online special consideration tool is now available for all special consideration applications, assessments and exams (centrally conducted and Faculty based) at www.uts.edu.au/current-students/managing-your-course/classes-and-assessment/special-circumstances/special. The application form must be lodged before the due date of the assessment item. 19/02/2018 (Autumn 2018) © University of Technology Sydney Page 6 of 9 Assessment task 1: YouTube presentation for journal club contribution Intent: Students will examine the social determinants of health in the peer reviewed literature to identify evidence for health inequity. Objective(s): This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s): A, B, C and D This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s): 1.0, 3.0 and 5.0 Weight: 50% Task: This is an individual assignment involving the application of class learnings to examine social determinants and health inequalities in research outlined in a peer reviewed paper. Students will develop a video presentation to explain the key concepts and outline the implications of the findings and recommendations for public health practice. The presentations will then be posted on line for sharing with other students to promote further discussion and reflection. Length: 5-10 minutes Due: Friday 13 April 2018 Criteria: Students will select a public health and identify policy options to address the problem and key implementation considerations. Assessment task 2: Policy options paper Intent: Student will explore a current public health issue, examine policy options to address the issue and key implementation considerations. Objective(s): This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s): C, D and E This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s): 1.0 and 3.0 Weight: 50% Task: Students will select a contemporary health issue and package the research evidence on the social determinants for policymakers. Students will first need to articulate the public health issues and why it is a priority, then outline the research evidence addressing the different features of the issue concerned. These include the underlying problem, options to address the problem, and key implementation considerations. These options will need to be underpinned by a theoretic framework or conceptual model. The paper will need to take quality and local applicability considerations into account Students will be provided with a template and set of questions to consider to assist them to write their options paper. Length: 2000 words Due: Friday 1 June 2018 19/02/2018 (Autumn 2018) © University of Technology Sydney Page 7 of 9 Use of plagiarism detection software Turnitin compares submitted assignments with documents located on the Internet and a database of published material; and all assignments previously submitted to Turnitin. This includes your own previously submitted assignments. Students should check the originality report carefully prior to submission of their assessment item for marking to ensure that material that is not original is appropriately referenced. Students should ensure enough time is left for the software to generate an originality report before the assessment item due date. A late Turnitin report is not grounds for extension of an assessment item. Academic Integrity and Student Misconduct Academic integrity is central to the work of the University and is an essential part of the professional identity of graduates from the Faculty of Health. The University Academic Board advises students that: Academic integrity involves a good measure of trust between students, and between students and academic staff. Cheating, whether in the form of plagiarism, bringing unauthorised material into exams, submitting false requests for alternative exams or special consideration, or any other form, is a breach of this trust. Cheating also subverts the aims and value of students’ studies. In certain courses, this may have serious consequences for public health and safety (Advice to Students on Good Academic Practice, UTS Academic Board 98/5, Resolution AB98/86 www.gsu.uts.edu.au/policies/academicpractice.html) Plagiarism is defined in the UTS Student Rules as “taking and using someone else’s ideas or manner of expressing them and passing them off as his or her own by failing to give appropriate acknowledgement of the source to seek to gain an advantage by unfair means.”(UTS Student rules, section 16 Student misconduct and appeals Part A – General provisions, Definition of Misconduct http://www.gsu.uts.edu.au/rules/student/section-16.html#r16.2). It is a serious form of Student Misconduct and can result in harsh penalties. Plagiarism includes, but is not limited to: copying words, or ideas, from websites, reference books, journals, newspapers or other sources without acknowledging the source; paraphrasing material taken from other sources, to change the words but keep the ideas, without acknowledging the source; downloading material from the internet and including it as part of your own work without acknowledging the source; copying work, such as all or part of an assignment, from other persons and your own previously submitted assignments and submitting it as your own work;


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