federal rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act?

Ceasar Wright was a longshoreman in Charleston, South Carolina, and a member of the International Longshoremen’s Association (AFL-CIO). Wright used the union hiring hall. The collective bargaining agreement (CBA) of Wright’s union provides for arbitration of all grievances. Another clause of the CBA states: ?oIt is the intention and purpose of all parties hereto that no provision or part of this Agreement shall be violative of any Federal or State Law.??
On February 18, 1992, while Wright was working for Stevens Shipping and Terminal Company (Stevens), he injured his right heel and back. He sought permanent compensation from Stevens and settled his claims for $250,000 and another $10,000 in attorney fees. Wright was also awarded Social Security disability benefits.
In January 1995, Wright, whose doctor had approved his return to work, returned to the hiring hall and asked to be referred for work. Wright did work between January 2 and January 11, 1995, but when the companies realized Wright had been certified as permanently disabled, they deemed him not qualified for longshoreman work under the CBA and refused to allow him to work for them.
Wright did not file a grievance under the union agreement but instead hired a lawyer and proceeded with a claim under the Americans with Disabilities Act. The district court dismissed the case because Wright had failed to pursue the grievance procedure provided by the CBA. Must Wright pursue the dispute procedure first, or can he go right to court on the basis of his federal rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act?

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