Read“Who’s Irish?” by Gish Jenand “Optimists” by Richard Ford, then finish TWO Journal Reports (in the attachment) according to the sample that I am sending with. 

Read“Who’s Irish?” by Gish Jenand “Optimists” by Richard Ford, then finish TWO Journal Reports (in the attachment) according to the sample that I am sending with.
Student First Name and Last Name Professor Lu Ann Thompson ENGL 1213, Sec. 2XX 23 January 2019 Journal Report Fiction Title of the Story and Publication Information: Catherine O’Flaherty Chopin or Kate Chopin wrote “The Story of an Hour” on April 19, 1894. It was first published in Vogue (the same magazine that is sold today) on December 6, 1894, under the title “The Dream of an Hour.” It was reprinted in St. Louis Life on January 5, 1895, with two changes that are included in this version of the story. One of those change adds the word “her” to the first sentence of paragraph 14. Author: Kate Chopin Main Character and traits: Mrs. Louise Mallard is a wife who is overjoyed to find out her husband has died because his death will give her independence. Emotional, intelligent, oppressed. Other Characters and traits: • Brently Mallard – Louise’s husband, supposedly killed in a train accident. • Josephine – Louise’s sister. Josephine informs Louise about Brently’s death. • Richards – Brently’s friend. Richards learns about the train accident and Brently’s death at the newspaper office, and he is there when Josephine tells the news to Louise. Setting: One hour inside the Mallard’s house where the women are confined but the men come and go. Late nineteenth century. Could be Northern Louisiana or New Orleans, both places where Chopin lived. Plot Summary Paragraph: Louise Mallard has heart trouble, so her sister, Josephine, carefully informs her about her husband’s death. Louise, alone in her room, looks out an open window. She tries to suppress her building emotions, but she can’t because she’s finally free from the oppression of marriage and ecstatic about her newfound sense of independence. She fantasizes about all the days and years ahead and hopes that she lives a long life. After she calms down, she opens the door, and she and her sister, Josephine, walk down the stairs where Richards, Brently Mallard’s friend, is waiting. The front door unexpectedly opens behind Richards, and Brently walks in. He hadn’t been in the train accident or even aware that one had happened. Richards tries unsuccessfully to block Louise from seeing Brently, but Louise sees him anyway and collapses. Doctors arrive and pronounce that Louise died of a heart attack brought on by the shock of happiness. Point of View: Third person limited– the narrator knows the thoughts and feelings of Louise Mallard. Tone/Voice: guilty yet relieved, ironic. In the beginning of the story, the language is cautious. Louise has a heart condition, and the people who love her are worried about telling of her husband’s death. The tone shifts after Louise learns that she is “free.” Her language becomes emotional and excited because she sees a future in which she can live independently. Symbol: Heart trouble. The heart trouble that afflicts Louise is both a physical and symbolic malady that represents her oppressive marriage and unhappiness with her lack of freedom. The open window is also a symbol of her new independence filled with opportunity. Theme: Self-autonomy brings a person joy. Marriages, even the kindest ones, are inherently oppressive Opinion: What is your opinion of the story? Did you like it? Why or why not? Did it spark a new way of thinking? Challenge you to think differently about a topic? Did you understand the story? If not, what parts were confusing? In what way does the story connect with your life? Nonfiction Type a citation for the nonfiction reading underneath this yellow highlighted area. Use correct MLA format. Cruea, Susan M. “Changing Ideals of Womanhood During the Nineteenth-Century Woman Movement.” ATQ, vol. 19, no. 3, Sept. 2005, pp. 187–204. EBSCOhost, 199.245.164.25:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db= aph&AN=18461632&site=ehost-live&scope=site. Accessed 17 January 2019. Copy and paste an original passage from the nonfiction assignment that supports your explanation here. Ironically, while a True Woman was assumed to be a pillar of moral strength and virtue, she was also portrayed as delicate and weak, prone to fainting and illness. She dared not exert herself too much physically or be emotionally startled for fear of her health. Strenuous physical activity was discouraged, as women were considered to have “much more delicate nervous system[s] than . . . men because of the particular function of their reproductive organs . . . . [T]heir fragile nervous systems were likely to be overstimulated or irritated, with disastrous results” (Cogan 29). Type the summary, paraphrase, or quotation here. Be sure to use a signal phrase, correct in-text documentation, and a label for the method you chose. According to Frances Cogan , women’s “fragile nervous systems were likely to be overstimulated or irritated, with disastrous results” (qtd.in Cruea 189 ). Quotation Explain how your summary, paraphrase, or quotation connects to the short story. Connection to nonfiction: If this story took place in the late nineteenth century, about 125 years ago, wives had very few rights. Husbands controlled everything. In addition, society at that time believed that the True Woman had a fragile nervous system and couldn’t handle stress, which only compounded a woman’s dependence. Even if the husband were a benevolent person, the lack of self-autonomy had to be stifling for women, especially intelligent women like Louise Mallard who wanted to live an independent life. Louise’s heart condition along with the prevailing belief of the day that women had delicate nervous systems that should not be overtaxed provides her loved ones with a convenient explanation for Louise’s death. The irony is that Louise did die from an irritated nervous system, but the catalyst was the shock of disappointment instead of happiness.

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